Seminar Series

The HESP Department sponsors a series of talks on current research in the areas of hearing, speech, and language by visiting researchers or members of the HESP faculty. All students, faculty, staff, and affiliates are welcome and encouraged to attend. If you would like to join the email distribution list for all upcoming HESP Seminar Series talks, email Dr. Matt Goupell at goupell@umd.edu

Certification Maintenance Hours can be earned by attending these talks.

Click here to follow our google calendar!

 

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

12:00-1:00pm

Jack Noble

Vanderbilt

Computer-assistance techniques for cochlear implant interventions

Cochlear implants (CIs) are neural prosthetics that induce the sensation of hearing by stimulating the auditory nerve using an array of electrodes implanted in the cochlea. While the traditional intervention has been remarkably successful, it leads to widely varying hearing outcomes. It has been suspected that outcomes are highly sensitive to the positioning of the CI electrodes in the cochlea. Dr. Noble has investigated this relationship using novel image analysis techniques he developed that permit measurement of the position of CI electrodes in patient CT images. Leveraging discoveries from these investigations, his current research aims to improve outcomes with CIs through the development of novel computer assistance systems for (1) comprehensive pre-operative surgery planning and intra-operative guidance to improve electrode positioning and (2) patient-customized selection of settings on the CI processor, which, as shown in ongoing clinical studies, can mitigate the negative effects of sub-optimal electrode positioning and significantly improve hearing outcomes. In this seminar, Dr. Noble will present solutions that have been developed, current results, and directions for future research.

Lefrak Hall 2208

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

12:00-1:00pm

Rebecca Bieber

UMD HESP

Adaptation to novel foreign-accented speech and retention of benefit following training: Influence of aging and hearing loss

 
Adaptation to speech with a foreign accent is possible through prior exposure to talkers with that same accent. For young listeners with normal hearing, short term, accent-independent adaptation to a novel foreign accent is also facilitated through exposure training with multiple foreign accents. In the present study, accent-independent adaptation is examined in younger and older listeners with normal hearing and older listeners with hearing loss. Retention of training benefit is additionally explored. Stimuli for testing and training were HINT sentences recorded by talkers with nine distinctly different accents. Following two training sessions, all listener groups showed a similar increase in speech perception for a novel foreign accent. While no group retained this benefit at one week post-training, results of a secondary reaction time task revealed a decrease in reaction time following training, suggesting reduced listening effort. Examination of listeners’ cognitive skills reveals a positive relationship between working memory and speech recognition ability. The present findings indicate that, while this no-feedback training paradigm for foreign-accented English is successful in promoting short term adaptation for listeners, this paradigm is not sufficient in facilitation of perceptual learning with lasting benefits for younger or older listeners.
 
 
 
Lefrak Hall 2208

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

12:00-1:00pm

Ana Taboada Barber

UMD Department of Counseling, Higher Education, & Special Education

TBA

TBA

Lefrak Hall 2208

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

12:00-1:00pm

Katie Van Holzen

UMD HESP

Phonological and lexical processing in first language and multilingual acquisition

TBA

Lefrak Hall 2208

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

12:00-1:00pm

Natalie Cabrera 

UMD Department of Counseling, Higher Education, & Special Education

Fathers (and mothers) and children's development: Evidence from early to middle-childhood

In this talk I provide an overview of the research on fathers and children's development during the early childhood period. I begin with a (1) brief discussion of the early research on parenting that mostly focused on mothers; (2) provide a policy social context imperative for renew attention to the role of fathers in children's lives; and (3) highlight several studies from our lab that focus on the contributions that fathers (and mothers) make to their children's cognitive and social development.

Lefrak Hall 2208


Seminar Series Archive: To see a list of previous HESP Seminars click here. 

 

Certification Maintenance Hours:

Those who attend these seminars will be awarded Certification Maintenance Hours (CMHs). A CMH is 60 minutes of time spent as a learner and participant in a non-ASHA CEU professional development activity. CMHs are different from ASHA-approved CEUs, which are also offered through the department. ASHA permits the use of CMHs for the purpose of maintaining your CCCs. However, you are responsible for maintaining documentation verifying completion of each activity. Documentation will not be maintained on the ASHA CE Registry. For additional information about CMHs and ASHA certification requirements, please click here. Please be aware that state regulatory agencies and boards of education might not recognize or accept CMHs.

 
 
Extracting meaning from auditory signals: A look at how children process variation in language