Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology: Overview

** Download the "Overview of the Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology" here **

 

 

Table of Contents

 

Program Overview
Outline of Degree Completion Requirements
 
 
 

 

Program Overview

 

The Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology (CAUD) is an academically based, clinically oriented program designed primarily to prepare professional Audiologists. While information pertaining to hearing disorders comprises the central focus of the degree, education about the normal processes of communication, as well as about research design, is considered an integral part of the program.

 

The primary goal of the CAUD program in Audiology is to provide knowledge and promote advanced competencies in the assessment, prevention, and habilitation/rehabilitation of disorders of hearing and vestibular function. The secondary goal is to provide students with basic competencies in the design of clinically oriented empirical studies of auditory and vestibular function.

 

The CAUD program offers two degree tracks: one track leads to the Doctor of Audiology (Au.D.) degree and the other track leads to dual degrees [Au.D./ Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree]. The Au.D. track entails a comprehensive educational program with a focus on clinical practicum and coursework that trains individuals to become professional audiologists; the dual degree track provides similar clinical training and coursework, in addition to more extensive research training, to students interested in pursuing both the Au.D. and Ph.D. degrees. Both tracks of the Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology exceed the academic and clinical practicum requirements for the Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC) granted by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). The graduate program at the University of Maryland is accredited by ASHA. The degrees also satisfy academic and clinical practicum requirements for Board Certification in Audiology granted by the American Board of Audiology (ABA).

 

ASHA requirements stipulate that as of January 1, 2007, individuals seeking certification in Audiology are required to have 75 hours of graduate study in Audiology and related disciplines, a one-year, full-time clinical internship, and demonstration of acquisition of knowledge and mastery of skills in a number of specific substantive areas. In the year 2012, a doctoral degree, which includes the one-year, full-time clinical experience, will be required by ASHA for the practice of Audiology. Both tracks of the Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology exceed these requirements. Details of the requirements for ASHA certification are described later in this document. The American Academy of Audiology (AAA) specifies that a doctoral level degree in Audiology from a regionally accredited college or university, in addition to specified clinical practice, is required for Board Certification in Audiology. Further details of the American Board of Audiology Certification Program can be found in Appendix I. Additionally, most states have licensure requirements for the practice of Audiology, which vary from state to state. However, most state licensure laws follow ASHA requirements.

 

The Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology at the University of Maryland accepts students who hold a Bachelor's degree in Hearing and Speech Sciences, or who come from non-hearing and speech backgrounds. The latter group of students is required to complete appropriate preparatory coursework prior to full participation in the graduate program. Students are accepted into the post-BA program on a full-time basis. The Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology is also offered to students who have already earned a Master's degree in Audiology and who have practiced in the field for at least two years. The Doctoral Program for post-MA students is available on a full-time or part-time basis.

 

back to top of page

 

Admission Requirements for the Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology

 

Increasingly larger numbers of students are interested in pursuing careers in Audiology. Admission to the graduate programs in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences is on a very competitive basis. Successful applicants typically demonstrate a minimum GPA of 3.2 from a master's degree program or from a baccalaureate program in hearing and speech sciences or a related discipline, along with strong GRE scores, well-written letters of intent, and strong letters of recommendation. The Admissions Committee evaluates all applications carefully, and considers the applicant's whole application, rather than scores in any single domain. Additionally, members of the Hearing and Speech Sciences faculty are available to answer questions which applicants might have regarding their potential qualifications for entry into our graduate programs. Potential applicants should call the Department office for further information, at (301) 405-4214.

 

Admission to all programs is primarily confined to fall matriculation, although students may enter the program in the preceding summer session to complete undergraduate pre-requisites. Prospective applicants should note that decisions on fall admissions are made in early March. Students must submit completed application materials for the fall semester by the deadline stated on the University of Maryland Graduate School website (http://www.gradschool.umd.edu) [note: this deadline is usually in early January].

 

Important note to all applicants:

Please Specify the Degree Program to Which You Are Seeking Admission

 

Please note that graduate students are admitted to a specific degree program in the Graduate School (i.e., Au.D. degree in Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology, dual degree Au.D./Ph.D. in Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology, M.A. degree in Speech-Language Pathology, traditional Ph.D. in Hearing and Speech Sciences). Students interested in either the Au.D. or dual degree (Au.D./Ph.D.) must specify the program code CAUD on the Graduate Application. Students interested in a traditional research Ph.D., without any clinical practicum training, should apply directly for admission to the Ph.D. program in Hearing and Speech Sciences, (Program Code: HESP).

 

 

Post-B.A. Applicants for Au.D. Degree

 

Students pursuing the post-B.A. doctoral program in Clinical Audiology are admitted on a full-time basis only . The time required for completion of the doctoral program in Clinical Audiology for post-B.A. students is usually four years of full-time graduate study for the Au.D. track. Individuals without a background in the hearing and speech sciences typically require an additional two semesters to complete the degree requirements.

 

 

Post-B.A. Applicants for Au.D./Ph.D. Degrees

 

Students who seek admission to the dual degree program will be competitive if they demonstrate unusual promise for a career in research. This includes outstanding performance in an undergraduate program of study, high GRE scores, and/or prior experience in a research laboratory culminating in presentations or publications of research findings. Students in the dual degree track are admitted on a full-time basis only. The time required for completion of the dual degree track is 6-7 years of full-time graduate study.

 

 

Applicants with a Graduate Degree in Audiology

 

The doctoral program in Clinical Audiology is also available to practicing audiologists. These applicants must have a graduate degree in audiology with a minimum grade point average of 3.2 in graduate work, and one of the following: the ASHA Certificate of Clinical Competence in Audiology (CCC-A), ABA Certification, or a valid state license to practice audiology. Admissions requirements further include a minimum of two years of recent, full time (32 hours/week) post-masters professional audiology experience preceding the application to the program, and three letters of recommendation supporting these experiences. Credentials of these students will be evaluated on an individual basis, and requirements for the program will be adjusted accordingly, permitting students to graduate in a much shorter time period. Students already holding an M.A. degree may enroll in the doctoral program on a part-time basis.

 

 

Applications to Switch Disciplines within the Department

 

tudents seeking to switch disciplines (e.g., Audiology to Speech-Language Pathology; Speech-Language Pathology to Audiology) must submit a written petition to the Departmental Admissions Committee. This petition will be evaluated against usual departmental standards for admission, the cohort of pending applicants to the semester of intended admission, as well as space availability. Applicants for program transfer must apply by the Graduate School deadline for application to graduate degree programs. The Departmental Admissions Committee will provide a written response to the applicant in a timely fashion. If the request is approved, the Admissions Committee will complete the form "Change of Graduate Degree" and submit it to Graduate Enrollment Management Services (GEMS) via e-mail. The form must be signed by the student's academic advisor, the Director of Graduate Studies of the program to which the student is switching, and the HESP Department Chair. This form can be downloaded from the department website.

back to top of page

 

 

Academic Requirements and Length of Program

 

Au.D. Degree

 

The track leading to the Au.D. degree requires 57 credit hours of graduate coursework, 4 credit hours for a capstone research project, 14 credit hours of clinical practicum registration, and 18 credit hours of full-time clinical internship registration, for a total of 93 credit hours. Au.D. students must pass comprehensive examinations and conduct a capstone research project. The expected time frame for completion of the full-time, post-BA Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology is 4 years, including summers, for the Au.D. track. For students who enter the doctoral program without a background in the hearing or speech sciences, the expected time frame for completion of the doctoral degree is an additional one to two semesters of full-time enrollment.

 

Professional audiologists (post-M.A.) who enter the Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology will be evaluated on an individual basis to determine the minimum requirements to complete the course of study for an Au.D. (See "Registration Requirements" for further details). It is anticipated that in most cases, the time period required for completion of the degree is 2 years equivalent full-time study for the Au.D. degree.

 

 

Dual Degree Program (Au.D./ Ph.D.)

 

The track leading to the Au.D./Ph.D. degrees in Clinical Audiology requires 60 credit hours of graduate coursework, 6 credit hours of pre-candidacy research, 12 credit hours of dissertation research, 12 credit hours of clinical practicum registration, and 18 credit hours of full-time clinical internship registration, for a total of 108 credit hours. Ph.D. students must develop an individual study plan with the approval of a faculty Program Planning Committee (PPC), complete candidacy research, pass comprehensive examinations, and complete a dissertation and oral defense. Full-time students are expected to complete the Ph.D. track in approximately 6-7 years, including summers. Upon advancing to Doctoral Candidacy (completing coursework, comprehensive examinations, and candidacy research project) and completing the 4 th -year clinical internship, students will be awarded the Au.D. degree.

 

Professional audiologists (post-M.A.) who enter the Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology will be evaluated on an individual basis to determine the minimum requirements to complete the course of study for the dual degree track. (See "Registration Requirements" for further details). Professional audiologists who seek this track generally will require 4-5 years equivalent full-time study for the Ph.D. degree. These students will be awarded the Au.D. degree upon completion of coursework, comprehensive examinations, and the Candidacy Research project.

 

 

Applications to Switch from the Au.D. to the dual degree (Au.D./Ph.D.) program

 

Students in the Au.D. track have the option to apply to switch to the Au.D./ Ph.D. track. The Au.D./Ph.D. is a highly rigorous program that combines clinical training with a significant research component culminating in a 12-credit dissertation. The Department encourages academically talented students who seek a career in research or academia to contemplate this degree option. A formal mechanism exists for requesting a change in the degree program from the Au.D. degree to the dual (Au.D./Ph.D.) degree.

 

Students may request a change in their graduate degree no sooner than the end of the second year of graduate study. This time-frame is desirable so that students have had an opportunity to complete the Research Design and Quantitative Research Methods courses. Students will be permitted to request a change in degree status at any later time, as long as they fulfill all requirements for admission to candidacy and completion of the dual degrees as they proceed in their program of study.

 

Students requesting a change in the graduate degree must submit a packet of materials to the Director of the Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology. These materials include the following:

 

  1. a letter of intent
  2. a transcript of the first two years of graduate study
  3. a paper written by the student during any course in graduate school
  4. a curriculum vitae highlighting prior research experiences

 

The student's materials will be reviewed by a committee of the CAUD faculty, and the faculty will make a recommendation to the Admissions Committee. The committee will take into consideration the student's overall GPA and performance in the following classes: Research Design (HESP 724) and Quantitative Research Methods (EDMS 645). The Admissions Committee may conduct its own review of the application, and will inform the student of the final decision.

 

If the request is approved, the Admissions Committee will complete the form "Change of Graduate Degree" and submit it to Graduate Enrollment Management Services (GEMS) via e-mail. The form must be signed by the student's academic advisor, Director of the Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology, and the HESP Department Chair. This form can be downloaded from the department website.

 

back to top of page

 

 

Registration Requirements

 

Pre-requisites

 

Students whose undergraduate degrees are not in Hearing and Speech Sciences will be required to take undergraduate preparatory courses prior to, or concurrent with, enrolling in graduate-level courses. In addition, some general education requirements are specified by ASHA. These general education courses must be verified in the application for the CCC.

 

General pre-requisites. Any student who has not taken a course in statistics at the undergraduate level must complete a course in their graduate program, prior to enrolling in graduate-level statistics courses required for the degree. Students should note that courses for which only a portion of the semester was devoted to statistics are not acceptable. Additionally, students must have completed undergraduate coursework in the areas of life sciences, physical sciences, behavioral sciences, and mathematics beyond college algebra. At least one three-credit course in each of these areas must be completed for an applicant to be eligible for ASHA certification. Students must also demonstrate completion of relevant coursework in the areas of oral and written communication.

 

Discipline-specific pre-requisites. Students must have completed the following HESP undergraduate courses or their equivalents (see the Course Descriptions section of this document for further information):

HESP 300: Introduction to Psycholinguistics
HESP 311: Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathology of the Auditory System
HESP 400: Speech and Language Development in Children
HESP 407: Bases of Hearing Science
HESP 417: Principles and Methods of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology

 

 

Credit for Previous Graduate Coursework

 

The University of Maryland automatically allows transfer of up to six credits (e.g., two courses) of eligible graduate coursework taken before matriculation, or at another institution, into a graduate program. A new Graduate School policy enables departments to exercise discretion in raising this number to 12 credits (four courses). Students wishing to transfer up to 12 credits must petition the HESP faculty for consideration of these additional credits.

 

 

Post-B.A. Students

 

The Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology for post-BA students is a full-time program; part-time students are not accepted. Graduate education in this discipline requires timely and concurrent registrations in both academic and clinical experiences. Full-time registration is formally defined by the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences as enrollment for 8-12 credits per semester. In the first two years of study, this will typically consist of three graduate courses and two credits of clinical practicum per semester. For Au.D. students, the third year registration will typically include two graduate courses, two or three credits of clinical practicum per semester and four credits for the capstone research project; the fourth year registration is primarily for the full-time clinical internship. For Au.D./Ph.D. students, Years 3, 4, and 5 include additional coursework, candidacy and dissertation research, and the full-time clinical internship. Full-time commitment and course sequence are critical, because most graduate courses are offered only once per academic year and course content is closely tied to clinical practicum assignments. Moreover, full-time enrollment assures timely completion of the program. Enrollment in clinical practicum places significant time demands on students during the work week. Clinicians registered for clinical practica should be prepared to devote approximately 20-30 hours per week to the preparation, implementation, and analysis of clinical experiences.

 

All students seeking the Au.D. degree must accumulate a minimum of 93 hours of graduate level academic coursework and clinical practicum. Each student in the Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology will develop an Individual Study Plan with his/her graduate advisor during the first year of the program, to be reviewed annually. The Study Plan for post-B.A. students pursuing the Au.D. track will include required and elective courses, potential sites for clinical internships, comprehensive exam areas, and the capstone research project.

 

Students pursuing the dual degree track (Au.D./Ph.D.) must successfully complete 108 hours of graduate level academic coursework and clinical practicum. For students accepted into the dual degree track, the Individual Study Plan will be developed by the student in consultation with the advisor. This Plan must be approved annually by a Program Planning Committee (PPC) composed of the advisor and at least two additional members of the Department's faculty who are members of the Graduate Faculty of the University of Maryland . The Study Plan for Au.D./Ph.D. students will include required courses, elective courses, potential sites for a research internship, potential sites for clinical internships, comprehensive exam areas, and a dissertation plan.

 

 

Post-MA students

 

As noted above, post-MA students who are practicing audiologists may enroll in the Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology on either a full-time or a part-time basis. Full-time registration is formally defined by the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences as enrollment for 8-12 credits per semester. A typical part-time load is two courses per semester (approximately 6 credits).

 

Each student who has already earned an M.A. in Audiology will furnish a transcript of previous graduate coursework successfully completed, as well as a documented description of clinical experience. It is generally expected that a minimum of 30 credits will be taken in the core and elective areas combined, comprehensive examinations will be completed, and a minimum of 4 credits will be taken for the capstone research project for satisfactory completion of the Au.D. degree. Clinical practicum registrations will be available in advanced diagnostic and rehabilitative techniques.

 

A professional student who selects the dual degree track will similarly develop an Individual Study Plan with their academic advisor, in consultation with the Program Planning Committee ( PPC), and will take coursework and research registrations commensurate with that degree.

 

The Study Plan for post-M.A. students will be limited to required courses that have not been taken previously, elective courses, comprehensive exam areas, a research project/dissertation plan, and potential clinical rotations if they are deemed necessary.

 

 

Registration After Admission to Doctoral Candidacy

 

Students seeking the Au.D. degree who have met all of the coursework requirements for the degree, passed comprehensive examinations, and passed the Capstone Research I course (HES 849) will be advanced to Doctoral Candidacy. Graduate school regulations specify that students must be advanced to Doctoral Candidacy at least 6 months prior to graduation. Students planning spring graduation must be advanced to Doctoral Candidacy no later than October 1 of the preceding semester. Students must be enrolled for at least one credit, regardless of credits already accumulated, in the semester of graduation. Students who are graduating in the summer must register for one credit of either HESP 859 or HESP 829 (Capstone Research II or Clinical Internship, respectively) to satisfy this requirement, depending on the reason for delayed graduation.

 

Students seeking the dual degree (Au.D./Ph.D.) who have completed all of the coursework requirements, passed comprehensive examinations, and completed the Candidacy Research Project (HESP 898) will be advanced to Doctoral Candidacy. Once a student is admitted to Doctoral Candidacy, the Graduate School automatically registers the student for 6 credits of HESP 899 (Doctoral Dissertation Research) for each fall and spring semester until all requirements for the degree are completed. All students must be enrolled for at least one credit, regardless of credits already accumulated, in the semester of graduation. Students who are graduating in the summer must register for one credit of HESP 899 or HESP 798 (Independent Study) to satisfy this requirement.

 

Maintaining Good Academic Standing in Graduate School

 

A minimum grade point average of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) is required for all courses taken after matriculation as a graduate student. Students whose GPA falls below a 3.0 will be placed on academic probation. Students on academic probation cannot take comprehensive examinations, go on outside placements, or begin the 4 th year clinical externship. Please see the section on Department Policy Pertaining to Clinical Practicum Enrollments for further information on implications of academic probation. The Graduate School Catalog also has relevant information on academic probation (see http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/catalog/academic_record.htm).

 

back to top of page

 

 

Detailed Curriculum for the Dual-Degree (Au.D./Ph.D.)

Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology

 

NOTE: The curricula shown do not reflect additional coursework that may be necessary to meet ASHA certification requirements for students coming to the graduate program from non-HESP backgrounds.

 

Au.D. Curriculum

 

Undergraduate Pre-Requisite Courses (12 credits)

HESP 300 Introduction to Psycholinguistics (3)
HESP 311 Anatomy and Physiology of the Auditory System (3)
HESP 400 Speech and Language Development in children (3)
HESP 407 Bases of Hearing Science (3)

Core Courses

•  Basic Science (9 credits)

HESP 600 Instrumentation (3) OR HESP 604 Acoustic and Perceptual Phonetics (3)
HESP 722 Experimental Audiology (Psychoacoustics) (3)
HESP 724 Research Design (3)

•  Audiology (39 credits)

HESP 606 Basic Hearing Measurement (3)
HESP 630 Electrophysiologic Measurements I (3)
HESP 632 Medical Audiology (3)
HESP 635 Rehabilitative Audiology (3)
HESP 636 Geriatric Audiology (3)
HESP 645 Pediatric Audiology (3)
HESP 646 Educational Audiology (3)
HESP 658A Ethics and Professional Issues in Clinical Audiology (2)
HESP 658B Supervision (1)
HESP 700 Hearing Aids I (3)
HESP 701 Hearing Aids II (3)
HESP 706 Advanced Clinical Audiology (3)
HESP 710 Industrial and Environmental Noise (3)
HESP 730 Vestibular-ocular Function and Assessment (Electrophysiologic Measures II) (3)

•  Additional Course Requirements (3 credits)

EDMS 645 Quantitative Research Methods I (3)

Electives ( 6 credits ), some examples include :

HESP 848 HESP seminars (3 credits/each) including Cochlear Implant Seminar, Counseling Seminar, Tinnitus Seminar, Private Practice Seminar
EDMS 646 Quantitative Research Methods II

Capstone Research Project: (4 credits)

HESP 849 Capstone Research I (2)
HESP 859 Capstone Research II (2)

 

Dual Degree (Au.D./Ph.D.) Curriculum

 

Undergraduate Pre-Requisite Courses (12 credits)

HESP 300 Introduction to Psycholinguistics (3)
HESP 311 Anatomy and Physiology of the Auditory System (3)
HESP 400 Speech and Language Development in children (3)
HESP 407 Bases of Hearing Science (3)

Core Courses

•  Basic Science (9 credits)

HESP 600 Instrumentation (3) OR HESP 604 Acoustic and Perceptual Phonetics (3)
HESP 722 Experimental Audiology (Psychoacoustics) (3)
HESP 724 Research Design (3)

•  Audiology (36 credits)

HESP 606 Basic Hearing Measurement (3)
HESP 630 Electrophysiologic Measurements I (3)
HESP 632 Medical Audiology (3)
HESP 635 Rehabilitative Audiology (3)
HESP 636 Geriatric Audiology (3)
HESP 645 Pediatric Audiology (3)
HESP 658B Supervision (1)
HESP 700 Hearing Aids I (3)
HESP 701 Hearing Aids II (3)
HESP 706 Advanced Clinical Audiology (3)
HESP 710 Industrial and Environmental Noise (3)
HESP 730 Vestibular-ocular Function and Assessment (Electrophysiologic Measures II) (3)

•  Additional Course Requirements (9 credits)

BIOL 600 Scientific Ethics (2)
EDMS 645 Quantitative Research Methods I (3)
EDMS 646 Quantitative Research Methods II (3)

Electives (9 credits)

Pre-Dissertation and Dissertation Research: (18 credits)
HESP 898 Doctoral Candidacy Research (6)
HESP 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (12)
 

 

back to top of page

 

 

Clinical Certification Requirements by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the American Board of Audiology

 

In order to meet requirements for ASHA's Certificate of Clinical Competence (C.C.C.) in Audiology, students must earn at least 75 semester credit hours of graduate work culminating in a doctoral or other recognized graduate degree. The course of study must address the knowledge and skills pertinent to the field of audiology. This transitional standard is in effect from January 1, 2007 , through January 1, 2012 , at which time applicants for certification must have a doctoral degree.

 

Applicants for certification must complete a program of graduate study (a minimum of 75 semester credit hours) that includes academic coursework and a minimum of 12 months' full-time equivalent of supervised clinical practicum sufficient in depth and breadth to achieve the knowledge and skills outcomes stipulated in the standard.

 

Although specific coursework is not detailed in the standard, applicants for certification must have acquired knowledge and developed skills in four areas: foundations of practice, prevention and identification, evaluation, and treatment. In addition, applicants must have prerequisite skills in oral and written or other forms of communication, as well as in life sciences, physical sciences, behavioral sciences, and mathematics. Evidence of successful completion of the required knowledge and skills is through formative and summative assessments. Each student will be required to maintain a portfolio of the formative and summative assessments conducted as part of coursework, clinical practicum, and the comprehensive examination process. Further, it is crucial that students meet with advisors to assure that their curriculum plan will satisfy ASHA requirements for certification.

 

Specific requirements for certification in Audiology may be found in the ASHA Membership and Certification handbook, which may be obtained by contacting the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association:

 

American Speech, Language and Hearing Association
2200 Research Blvd.
Rockville , MD 20850
(800) 498-2071

 

A copy of the ASHA certification requirements is always included in the orientation packet and should be retained for future reference.

 

The requirements are also posted on ASHA's website:
http://www.asha.org/certification/aud_standards_new.htm

 

Information on applying for certification can be found online at:
http://www.asha.org/certification/AudCertification.htm

 

The American Board of Audiology (ABA) does not detail any specific coursework required for certification. The ABA requires applicants to have an earned doctoral level degree in Audiology from a regionally accredited college or university, including 375 supervised hours of direct patient care and 2,000 hours of mentored professional practice in Audiology. Please see Appendix I for further details of ABA certification. More information on the application procedure for ABA certification can be found online at: http://www.boardofaudiology.org/

 

back to top of page

 

 

GPA Requirements

 

 

The Graduate School requires that students maintain a 3.0 overall GPA (including both academic coursework andclinical practica); students with GPAs below this go on academic probation. However, our department has slightly more specific requirements, above and beyond these graduate-school requirements:

 

1.  A minimum grade point average of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) is required for all academic courses taken after matriculation as a graduate student.  Academic courses include all courses other than 649A, 649B, 729, and 829.

 

2.  Clinical practicum requirements are that students receive a minimum grade of  B-; students not meeting that requirement will be reviewed by the faculty to determine eligibility for future practicum placement.

 

3.  Students pursuing prerequisite coursework (that is, students with provisional admission) mustmaintain a 3.25 GPA in these courses in order to maintain their eligibility for graduate-level coursework.  

 

Finally, the Graduate School determines probationary status on the basis of graduate-level coursework only – this includes courses 400-level and above.  Thus, a student who is taking  prerequisite coursework needs not only to maintain an overall 3.25 GPA, but must also be above a 3.0 when only the courses at the 400-level and above are considered.

 

A student on academic probation at the end of a given semester  is not eligible for outside placement during the next semester (he or she must register for a semester of in-house practicum). Moreover, students cannot graduate, take comprehensive exams, or defend a thesis while on academic probation.

 

Please note that it is the student's responsibility to calculate his or her own GPA and to ensure continued non-probationary status. Instructions on how to calculate a GPA can be found on this page: https://hesp.umd.edu/content/how-apply. If a student's grades fall below the minimum levels, he or she is responsible for setting up an immediate meeting with the academic advisor to discuss the situation, prior to receiving any notification from the Graduate School or the Department. 

 

back to top of page

 

 

Clinical Practicum

 

In order to be recommended to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association for Clinical Certification in Audiology, and to comply with standards effective for applications made to the Association after January 1, 2007, a student must accumulate the equivalent of 12 months full-time clinical practicum. ABA certification requires 375 hours of supervised direct patient care and 2,000 hours of mentored professional practice. These requirements are satisfied through the doctoral program's required clinical practicum sequence. Practicum enrollment is concurrent with coursework registration, and carries additional registration charges.

 

Students engage in practicum throughout their first three years to ensure breadth of clinical experience. First and second year students complete their practicum training on campus at the Department's Speech and Hearing Clinic, under the supervision of program faculty. Beginning with the second semester of the second year, students will continue the training in at least two external placements throughout the Greater Washington, DC and Baltimore , MD areas. Externships are chosen to match program goals and student interest.

 

The Clinical Externship, typically completed during the fourth year of the program, is the final clinical requirement necessary for the student's training. The Doctoral program in Clinical Audiology will make every effort to ensure that students obtain externships consistent with the goals of the training program.

 

Clinical Practicum Enrollment



Students interested in obtaining certification/licensure shall participate in clinical practicum during all or most semesters of their graduate training, until the clinical skills and the minimum amount of clinical experience required for the ASHA C.C.C. have been obtained. Prior to enrolling in clinical practicum, all students must have completed the undergraduate course, HESP 417 ( Principles and Methods in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology ) or its equivalent. Initially, all students perform evaluation and treatment activities at the University of Maryland Speech and Hearing Clinic. Registration in HESP 649A (Clinical Practice in Audiology: Diagnostic Procedures) is for two credit hours per semester. Registration in HESP 649B (Clinical Practice in Audiology: Aural Rehabilitation) is for two credit hours.

 

Students who have (1) demonstrated adequate skills in the University of Maryland Clinic , (2) obtained a satisfactory number of hours of clinical experience in HESP 649, and (3) satisfactorily completed appropriate coursework may apply for outside placement (HESP 729) in one of the hospital/clinic/school facilities in the Washington , D.C. or Baltimore metropolitan areas. These placements, which usually do not occur until the second or third year of graduate study, must be arranged and approved by the HESP faculty. Registration for HESP 729 (Advanced Clinical Practice in Audiology) is always for two credit hours. A listing of current outside placement opportunities for HESP students is provided in Appendix II. This list should be considered representative of student opportunities but is subject to change.

 

 

The Clinical Internship

 

Students in the fourth year of the Au.D. program will participate in a full-time clinical internship. Registration for the Clinical Internship (HESP 829: Clinical Internship Residency) is for a total of 18 credit hours. Usually, students register for 9 credit hours per semester in the fall and spring semesters of the fourth year. Students may distribute the credits in other ways, however, they must register for at least 12 credits during fall and spring semesters. The Internship can occur during the fourth or fifth year for students in the Au.D./Ph.D. track.

 

The Clinical Internship will be arranged by the student in conjunction with the HESP faculty. The Clinical Internship experience must receive prior approval by the HESP faculty. Students may identify sites for potential Internship placements and present the sites to the faculty for approval. Internship sites must provide the student with an on-site clinical supervisor who is certified and licensed and must also provide the student with the opportunity to participate in a range of audiological services. The Clinical Internship may take place in the Baltimore-Washington region or at a remote site. The minimum time commitment for the Clinical Internship is nine months of full-time employment.

 



Departmental Policy Pertaining to Clinical Practicum Enrollments

 

Departmental permission is required for registration in clinical practicum and is granted only to matriculated students. Students must possess the communicative competencies requisite for the satisfactory conduct of usual clinical procedures. Further, as the client population served by this program is predominantly English-speaking, participants in any clinical practicum must be fluent, intelligible speakers of English.

 

All students enrolled in clinical practicum are expected to abide by the ASHA Code of Ethics, the ABA Code of Ethics, and the AAA Code of Ethics, provided to each student upon admission to graduate study. Violations of the Code of Ethics may result in permanent dismissal from practicum placement opportunities, and may subject the student to dismissal from the academic degree program.

 

Clinical practicum students are expected to maintain professional dress and demeanor. Unprofessional conduct or any conduct which compromises the quality of care to clinic patients may result in dismissal from clinical practicum placements.

 

A student may not go on outside placement, including the Clinical Internship, if he/she is on academic probation (GPA below 3.0). A student will receive credit for hours earned in clinic registrations for which the student receives a grade of C or better; no hours will be credited for clinic registrations for which a student receives a grade of less than C. If a student receives a grade of "C" or less for a clinic registration, the student's performance will be reviewed by the faculty to determine eligibility for future practicum placement.

 

A student must complete a minimum of 30 hours of academic coursework prior to applying for outside placement. Students who receive a grade of C or less for an outside placement, or whose outside placements are terminated, must re-register for placement in the University of Maryland Speech and Hearing Clinic (through HESP 649A) and earn a final grade of B or better during the following semester, before being permitted to re-register for outside placement.

 

Students must successfully complete all coursework [with the exception of the Seminars in Ethics (HESP 658A or BIOL 600) and the Seminar in Supervision (HESP 658B)] with a grade of C or better , maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher, complete a minimum of two outside placements and pass the Comprehensive Examinations before they are eligible to begin their Clinical Internship. In addition, students must complete Capstone Research I (HESP 849) and preferably also complete Capstone Research II (HESP 858) before beginning the Clinical Internship. Arrangements for the Clinical Internship will not be made until the student has completed Capstone Research I (HESP 849); for best placements, this should occur by the end of Year 2 in the program. Typically, there is a 9-month lag between the start of negotiations for outside placements and the beginning of the placement itself. Students should be aware that if they begin the Clinical Internship prior to completing Capstone Research II (HESP 859), they should expect that completion of the capstone research project will take a significant period of time after they have finished the 4 th -year Clinical Internship. Graduation and awarding of the degree will be delayed until the capstone research project is completed.

 

back to top of page

 

 

Research and Comprehensive Examination Requirements

 

Au.D. Students

 

Comprehensive Examinations. University of Maryland regulations state that all doctoral candidates are required to pass comprehensive examinations. The comprehensive examinations usually will be taken during the spring semester of the third year of study for full-time, post-B.A. students. The timing and sequence of comprehensive examinations for professional, post-M.A. students will be determined on an individual basis. In all cases, comprehensive examinations must be taken within five years of admission to the program and at least 6 months prior to completion of the doctoral degree to meet Graduate School requirements.

 

Specific examination questions will be prepared by the program faculty. The broad content areas of the comprehensive examinations for Au.D. students will emphasize audiologic assessment, audiologic habilitation, hearing science, and research methodology. Students will meet with program faculty and will receive detailed information about the format and content of the comprehensive examinations during the semester prior to the administration of the examination.

 

The comprehensive examinations are administered in the College Computer Laboratory. Students are expected to type responses to comprehensive examination questions using Microsoft Word. Students may wish to familiarize themselves with the Open Labs in Lefrak Hall prior to their comprehensive testing date. Students requiring special accommodations must consult with their advisor at the start of the semester in which they will be taking the comprehensive examination to arrange for these accommodations.

 

The comprehensive examinations consist of seven questions distributed in the four broad areas of study listed above: Diagnostic Audiology (2 questions), Rehabilitative Audiology (2 questions), Hearing Science (2 questions), and Research Methods (1 question). Each question is graded by two faculty members. A student must pass all examination questions in order to be admitted to Doctoral Candidacy and prior to going on the 4 th year clinical internship.

 

Following the examination, students will be notified of their performance on the comprehensive examinations via email. Three outcomes are possible. A pass is given if the student receives passing grades on all questions. A contingent pass is given if a student passes all questions except one, in which case the student must retake the exam in the single failed area. A fail constitutes unsatisfactory performance on two or more questions of the written examination. In this case, the entire comprehensive examination must be retaken. In the case of a contingent pass, a student who fails the single question a second time must retake the entire examination. Failure to successfully pass all questions of a second administration of the comprehensive examination will result in dismissal from the program. Further information can be found in the comprehensive examination booklet that will be distributed to students the semester before they take the exam.

 

Admission to Candidacy. Au.D. students who complete all coursework, pass the comprehensive examinations, and complete Capstone Research I (HESP 849) are admitted to doctoral candidacy. Students must be admitted to doctoral candidacy at least 6 months before earning the doctoral degree.

 

Capstone Research Project. Successful completion of a capstone research project is a requirement for earning the Au.D. degree at the University of Maryland at College Park . Students enrolled in the Au.D. track are required to register for a minimum of 4 capstone research credits (2/ea: HESP 849 and HESP 859).

 

The capstone research may be an original, hypothesis-driven project of a theoretical, professional, or empirical nature, a retrospective analysis of an existing data set, a scholarly review of literature on a focused topic, or a grant proposal. The capstone project of an Au.D. student is generally expected to be clinically oriented. Written work completed for the capstone project will be prepared in accordance with the style requirements detailed in the most recent edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association . The student will present the capstone project to a faculty committee at the Capstone Research Day or other departmental seminar. Further information on the capstone research process will be provided as the student proceeds through the program.

 

 

Dual Degree (Au.D./Ph.D.) Students

 

Candidacy Research. The candidacy research project is designed to enhance students' research skills and productivity at a relatively early stage of their doctoral program. Students register for 6 credits of Doctoral Candidacy Research (HESP 898). The candidacy research may consist of directed research on a project managed by a faculty member in the program, directed research by qualified auditory researchers at UMCP or an affiliated institution, or an independent research project under faculty supervision. The candidacy paper research must be completed before the Au.D./ Ph.D. student is admitted to candidacy. Additional policy documents will be available to students that detail the candidacy research process and requirements.

 

Comprehensive Examination . The policy and nature of comprehensive examinations for Au.D./Ph.D. students are similar to those described for Au.D. students. The one additional requirement is that the Au.D./ Ph.D. student will write a comprehensive examination question in their area of research interest. This question will be administered in a take-home format.

 

Admission to Candidacy. An Au.D./ Ph.D. student is admitted to candidacy once they have completed all coursework, passed the comprehensive examination, and received approval of the candidacy research paper by the PPC. As stipulated by the graduate school, a student must be admitted to candidacy within five years after admission to the doctoral program and at least six months before the date on which the degree will be conferred.

 

Dissertation. Twelve credits of doctoral dissertation research (HESP 899) will be required of all students in the dual degree Au.D./Ph.D. track. The dissertation research is expected to be an original, hypothesis-driven project of a theoretical, professional, or empirical nature. The dissertation will be prepared in accordance with the requirements outlined in the University's Style and Policy Manual for Master's Theses and Doctoral Dissertations , and should be consistent with style requirements detailed in the most recent version of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association . Students must present a formal proposal to the Dissertation Committee for approval before work begins on the dissertation. This committee will consist of at least three members of the graduate faculty in the student's discipline and one representative of the Graduate School . Other members will be determined by the student in conjunction with the dissertation advisor. The proposal must be submitted to members of the Dissertation Committee at least two weeks prior to a defense of the proposal. The Dissertation Committee will meet with the student for an oral defense of the proposal.

 

After the oral proposal defense, the student will collect empirical data, analyze the data with appropriate statistics, write the dissertation, and orally defend the dissertation. In accordance with Graduate School requirements, the student must complete the doctoral program within nine years of beginning the program, or within five years after being advanced to candidacy.

 

back to top of page

 

 

IRB Approval

 

All students conducting capstone, candidacy or dissertation research using human participants or data previously collected from humans must obtain approval for the use of human subjects in research from the University of Maryland Institutional Review Board (IRB). This approval must be obtained regardless of the location of the data collection, and regardless of prior IRB approval from an off-campus site. There are no exceptions. IRB approval must be obtained prior to collection of any data from human subjects. Students failing to obtain approval from the IRB will not be awarded a doctoral degree by the University of Maryland at College Park .

 

Assistance in preparing the IRB proposal can be obtained from the University of Maryland IRB website at https://www.umresearch.umd.edu/RCO/New/index.html, from the Department's Faculty Liaison to the IRB and from the faculty mentor.

 

IRB proposals are submitted online using IRBNet at https://www.IRBNet.org. Tutorials for submitting proposals through IRBNet can be found at http://irbnetresources.org/. Access to the IRBNet submission website requires the common login (Directory ID and password).

 

Students conducting research using live vertebrate animals must gain approval from the Institutional Animal Care & Use Committee (IACUC). Proposals for IACUC are also found at the IRBNet website.

 

 

Outline of Degree Completion Requirements

 

Completion of the Doctoral Degree requires a number of steps, as described in the Degree Completion, Examination, and Graduation Manual , available from the Graduate School website http://www.gradschool.umd.edu.

 

Au.D. Degree

 

The steps for completion of the Au.D. Degree are summarized below. Some of these steps are completed simultaneously.

 

Step 1: Student completes all required coursework for the Degree.

 

Step 2 : Student completes supplemental departmental examinations. For Au.D. students, this entails completing Capstone Research I

 

Step 3 : Student completes departmental qualifying examinations (Comprehensive Examinations).

 

Step 4 . Student Advances to Candidacy.

 

Au.D. students who successfully complete the Comprehensive Examinations and Capstone Research I may advance to Doctoral Candidacy.

 

The student must complete the Application for Advancement to Candidacy Form for Au.D. Students, available on the web at http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/gss/forms/

 

A student must be admitted to Doctoral Candidacy at least 6 months prior to completing their doctoral degree.

 

Step 5 . Capstone Research Project is completed.

 

Step 6. Fourth-year clinical internship is completed.

 

Step 7. Application for Graduation

 

At the beginning of the semester in which the student expects to graduate, the student should complete the electronic Application for Graduation. Failure to submit the Application for Graduation by the posted deadline results in a delay in Graduation.

 

The Application for Graduation can be found at the website: http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/gss/forms/

The schedule of Graduate School Deadlines is available at http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/deadlines/

 

Additional forms must be completed during the final semester of graduate study that constitute approval of the program of study and verification of completion of the program of study. Forms can be found at the website: http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/gss/forms/

 

 

Au.D./Ph.D. Dual Degree

 

Step 1: Student completes all required coursework for the Degree.

 

Step 2 : Student completes supplemental departmental examinations.

 

Students must complete the Candidacy Paper requirement in addition to completing coursework (Step 1) and comprehensive examinations (Step 3) in order to advance to Doctoral Candidacy. Au.D./ Ph.D. students may complete the Candidacy Paper before or after completing the comprehensive examinations.

 

Step 3 : Student completes departmental qualifying examinations (Comprehensive Examinations).

 

Step 4 . Student Advances to Candidacy.

 

Au.D./Ph.D. students must successfully complete the Comprehensive Examinations and the Candidacy Paper to advance to Doctoral Candidacy.

 

The student must complete the Application for Advancement to Candidacy Form, available on the web at http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/gss/forms/

 

A student must be admitted to Doctoral Candidacy at least 6 months prior to completing their doctoral degree.

 

Step 5. Student completes 4 th -year clinical internship.

 

Au.D./Ph.D. students may complete the clinical internship during years 4, 5, or 6 of graduate study. Upon successful completion of coursework, comprehensive examinations, candidacy research, and the full-year clinical internship, students will be awarded the Au.D. degree. Appropriate forms must be completed by the student in order to receive the degree, available on the Graduate School website http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/gss/forms/

 

Step 6 . Dissertation is successfully proposed.

 

Step 7. Dissertation is successfully defended and submitted.

 

Step 8. Application for Graduation

 

At the beginning of the semester in which the student expects to graduate, the student should complete the electronic Application for Graduation. Failure to submit the Application for Graduation by the posted deadline results in a delay in Graduation.

 

The Application for Graduation can be found at the website: http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/gss/forms/

 

The schedule of Graduate School Deadlines is available at http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/deadlines/

 

Additional specific details regarding the completion of the doctoral degree, including the composition of the Doctoral Examination Committee, can be found at the website: http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/gss/forms/

 

back to top of page

 

 

University Deadlines for Graduation for Au.D./Ph.D. students

 

The University has strict deadlines, which must be followed to ensure timely graduation for those students who are completing a dissertation. University paperwork that must be completed and filed in order for a student to graduate consists of the following forms:

 

•  Diploma Application: due the second week of the semester during which graduation is expected

•  Nomination of Dissertation Committee Form: due six weeks after the beginning of the semester during which graduation is expected

•  Report of the Oral Examining Committee (for dissertations): due three weeks before the end of the semester in which graduation is expected

Specific dates for University paperwork deadlines are published each semester in the Schedule of Classes and are available on the website for the Graduate School ( http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/deadlines/ ).

 

Failure to meet University deadlines will typically result in delay of graduation for one full semester. During that semester, the student will be required to enroll for a minimum of one credit of registration.

 

PLEASE MEET ALL DEADLINES!

Students are responsible for delivering paperwork to the required campus offices .

The department cannot deliver materials for students.

 

Reminder: Graduate school regulations require all students to carry at least one credit of enrollment during the semester in which graduation is anticipated , regardless of the number of credits already accumulated. Students should plan accordingly. Failure to be enrolled for at least one credit during the semester of graduation may prevent timely receipt of the diploma.



back to top of page

 

 

Academic Integrity

 

"The University is an [intellectual] community. Its fundamental purpose is the creation and dissemination of knowledge. Like all other communities, the University can function properly only if its members adhere to clearly established goals and values. Essential to the fundamental purpose of the University is the commitment to the principles of truth and academic honesty. The Code of Academic Integrity is designed to ensure that the principle of academic honesty is upheld. While all members of the University community share this responsibility, The Code of Academic Integrity is designed so that special responsibility for upholding the principle of academic honesty lies with students." (from the Graduate Catalog; http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/catalog/academic_record.htm)

 

Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to: cheating (including use of unauthorized materials or study aids in any academic exercise), fabrication, and plagiarism. The Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences considers charges of academic dishonesty very seriously. Violations of the Code of Academic Integrity may result in expulsion of the student from the graduate program.



back to top of page

 

 

Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences Faculty and Interests

 

Information on current faculty and adjunct faculty members and their areas of interest can be obtained on the "About Us" section of the department website, under "People".

 

The "Faculty/Staff" section contains links to profiles of individual faculty members. Further information on ongoing research projects can also be found under the "Research" section of the website.

 

back to top of page

 

 

Course Descriptions: Required and Elective Courses in the Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology

 

Courses Offered in the Department of Hearing & Speech Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park

 

HESP 300. Introduction to Psycholinguistics (3).
Prerequisite: HESP 202.
An introduction to current theories of language and an investigation of their relationship to human communication behavior. Survey of the experimental literature relating to this question. 

HESP 311. Anatomy, Pathology and Physiology of the Auditory System (3).
Prerequisite: HESP 202.
Gross anatomy of the ear and pathways for transmission of sound energy through the peripheral and central auditory system. Causes, development and effects of pathological conditions contributing to temporary or chronic hearing impairments. 

HESP 400. Speech and Language Development in Children (3).
Prerequisite: HESP 300.
Analysis of the normal processes of speech and language development in children. 

HESP 403. Introduction to Phonetic Science (3).
Prerequisite: HESP 305.
An introduction to physiological, acoustic and perceptual phonetics: broad and narrow phonetic transcription; current models of speech production and perception. 

HESP 407. Bases of Hearing Science (3).
Prerequisite: HESP 311.
Fundamentals of hearing, including the physics of sound, psychophysical procedures used in measurement of auditory sensation and perception, and topics in psychological acoustics.

 HESP 411. Introduction to Audiology (3).
Prerequisite: HESP 311.
An introduction to the field of audiology. Evaluation and remediation of hearing handicaps. 

HESP 417. Principles and Methods in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology (3).
Prerequisite: HESP 402, HESP 411.
The principles underlying the treatment of speech, language and hearing disorders in children and adults; supervised observation of clinical activities.

 HESP 418. Clinical Practice in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology (3).
Prerequisite: HESP 417. Repeatable to 6 credits.
Supervised observation with some direct participation in clinical methods for the treatment of disorders of articulation, fluency, child and adult language; evaluation and habilitation/ rehabilitation of hearing impaired children and adults. 

HESP 420. Deafness and Sign Language (3) (previously 498a).
Introduction to ASL and deaf culture.

 HESP 498. Seminar (3).
Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs.
Selected topics pertaining to human communication and its disorders.

HESP 499. Independent Study (1-3).
Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs.
A directed study of selected topics pertaining to human communication and its disorders.

 HESP 600. Instrumentation in Hearing and Speech Sciences (3).
Prerequisite: permission of department.
Types and principles of operation of electronic equipment used in the hearing and speech sciences.

HESP 602. Neurological Bases of Human Communication (3).
Prerequisite: permission of department.
Basic neurology as it pertains to anatomical and physiological substrates of speech and language.

HESP 604. Acoustical and Perceptual Phonetics (3).

Prerequisite: permission of department.
Principles and current laboratory techniques in analysis of the acoustical characteristics of the speech signal and discussion of models of speech perception.

HESP 606. Basic Hearing Measurements (3).
Prerequisite: HESP 411 or equivalent.
Theoretical principles, methodology, and interpretation of routine audiometric tests, including pure tone, speech and acoustic immittance measures. Modification of procedures for special populations. Equipment calibration and mass hearing screening programs.

HESP 610. Aphasia (3).
Language problems of adults associated with brain injury.

HESP 616. Language Disorders in Children (3).
Prerequisite: HESP 400 or equivalent or permission of department.
Theoretical, empirical and clinical perspectives on language disorders in children.

HESP 620. Phonological and Articulatory Disorders (3).
Assessment and treatment of disorders at the phonological and articulatory levels of language and speech.

HESP 630. Electrophysiological Measurements I (3).
Prerequisite: HESP 606 or permission of department.
Principles and techniques of physiological and electrophysiological measures of the audio-vestibular mechanisms.

HESP 632. Medical Audiology (3).
Overview of auditory pathologies, and their assessment and management in the medical setting.

HESP 635. Aural Rehabilitation/Habilitation (3).
Principles, methods and procedures for aural rehabilitation/habilitation in children and adults.

HESP 636. Geriatric Audiology (3).
Physical effects of aging on the auditory periphery and central nervous system, as well as the consequences of aging on behavioral and electrophysiologic measures of auditory function.

HESP 639. Special Topics in Hearing and Speech Sciences (1-3).
Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Intensive coverage of selected topics of current interest.

 HESP 645. Pediatric Audiology (3).
Prerequisite: HESP 606 or permission of department.
Evaluation and treatment of hearing-impaired children.

HESP 646. Educational Audiology (3).
Examination of historical and current trends influencing educational programming for hearing-impaired children, communication options for severely and profound hearing-impaired children, and the role of the audiologist in the educational setting.

 HESP 649A and B. Clinical Practice in Audiology (1-3).
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Repeatable to 15 credits.
Supervised training in the application of clinical methods in the diagnosis and treatment of hearing disorders.

HESP 658A. Ethical and Professional Issues in Clinical Audiology (2).
A systematic review of ethical and legal issues governing the practice of clinical audiology.

HESP 658B. Seminar in Supervision (1).
Theoretical viewpoints on the supervisory process, with emphasis on effective communication skills and consideration of adult patterns of learning behavior.

HESP 700. Hearing Aids I (3).
Principles, methods and procedures for selection, fitting, calibration and management of amplification systems for
hearing-impaired adults.

\HESP 701. Hearing Aids II (3).
Advanced issues in amplification for hearing-impaired individuals, including hearing aid selection using digital signal processing algorithms, hearing aid selection for children, and implantable amplification devices.

HESP 706. Advanced Clinical Audiology (3).
Prerequisite: HESP 606 or equivalent.
Advanced clinical and experimental methods of evaluating the peripheral and central auditory system using acoustic stimuli. Procedural consideration and interpretation of test results.

HESP 708. Independent Study (1-6).
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Repeatable to 6 credits.
Individual research projects under guidance of a faculty member.

HESP 710. Industrial and Environmental Noise Problems (3).
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Evaluation and control of noise hazards. Effects of noise on man. Medico-legal aspects of noise-induced hearing impairment.

HESP 722. Experimental Audiology (3).
Experimental techniques in the investigation of problems in audiology.

HESP 724. Research Design (3).
Prerequisite: a course in basic statistics.
Evaluations of research designs, critique of published articles and student involvement in designing experiments on assigned topics.

 HESP 729. Advanced Clinical Practice in Audiology (1-8).
Prerequisite: HESP 649 and permission of instructor. Repeatable to 8 credits.
Clinical internship in selected off-campus facilities.

HESP 730. Vestibular-ocular Function and Assessment (Electrophysiologic Measures II) (3)
Advanced principles and methods of evaluating vestibular-ocular function using electrophysiologic measures. Includes rehabilitative issues pertaining to balance disorders and advanced electrophysiologic measures of auditory system function.

HESP 788. Research Externship (1-3).
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Repeatable to 6 credits.
Off-campus research experience with departmental affiliates at National Institutes of Health and other regional institutions.

HESP 808. Current Research in Hearing, Speech, and Language Services.

HESP 828. Seminar in Hearing Sciences.

 HESP 829. Clinical Internship Residency (9).
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Repeatable to 18 credits.
Off-campus, full-time research internship at regional and national institutions.

 HESP 848. Seminar in Audiology (3).

(Topics of recent Seminars: Cochlear Implants, Tinnitus, Signal Processing)
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Repeatable to 6 credits.

HESP 849. Capstone Research I (2).
Prerequisite: HESP 724

HESP 859. Capstone Research II (2).
Prerequisite: HESP 849. Repeatable to 6 credits.

 HESP 889. Doctoral Candidacy Research (1-6).  HESP 898. Pre-Candidacy Research (1-8).

 HESP 899. Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8).

Required/Elective Courses Offered at the University of Maryland , College Park

EDMS 645 Quantitative Research Methods I (3) (Au.D. and Ph.D. tracks)
EDMS 646 Quantitative Research Methods II (3) (Ph.D. track only)
NACS 618 The Classics in Neuroscience and Cognitive Science (3)
NACS 641 Introduction to Neuroscience (3)
NACS 651 The Neuroscience of Cognition (3)
PSYC 764 Comparative Neuroanatomy (3)
BIOL 600 Scientific Ethics (2)
BIOL 636 Hearing (3)

 

 

Electives Courses Offered at the University of Maryland , Baltimore

CIPP 909: Responsible Conduct of Research (2)
GERO 672 Issues in Aging Policy (3)
GERO 711 Biology of Aging (3)
GERO/PSYC 786: Psychology of Aging (3)
GERO/PREV 681: Epidemiology of Aging (3)
GPLS 604 Neuropharmacology (3)
GPLS 633 Pathways in Neuroscience (3)
GPLS 641 Introduction to Neuroscience (3)
GPLS 705 Basic Human Genetics (3)
GPLS 708 Clinical Genetics I (3)
GPLS 711 Genetic Epidemiology (3)
GPLS 778 Recording Neural Activity: Modern Methods (3)
MANA 633: Pathways in Neuroscience (3)
MPET 603: Fundamentals of Pharmacology (2)
MPHY 606: Physiology of the Central Nervous System (3)
MPHY 615: Biological Signal Analysis (3)
PREV 600: Principles of Epidemiology (3)
PREV 620: Principles of Biostatistics (3)
PREV 648: Health Care Administration and Evaluation (2)
PREV 650: Principles of Health Education and Promotion (3)
PREV 668: Environmental and Occupational Health (3)
PREV 707 Cost Effectiveness in Prevention and Treatment (3)
PREV 711 Genetic Epidemiology (3)
PTRS 706: Neuroscience (2)
PTRS 708: Rehabilitation Physiology (2-4)
PTRS 780 Plasticity in the Central Nervous System (2)   

 

 

Appendix I: American Board of Audiology Certification Requirements

 

Applicant Categories

 

Individuals seeking Board Certification in Audiology must demonstrate, through submission of appropriate documentation, evidence of initial mastery of core elements of audiologic practice. This evidence is presented through one of the following applicant categories: Board Certification, Board Certification through Reciprocal Eligibility, and Provisional Board Certification. All applicants must attest that they will abide by the ABA Code of Ethics. They must also attest that any licensure/registration that they hold is in good standing and that they will abide by the regulations applicable to such licensure/registration.

 

 

Board Certification

 

For applicants who have completed all requirements for Board Certification but do not hold a current state license/registration in audiology.

 

A. All applicants must have earned a doctoral level degree in audiology from a regionally accredited college or university. ABA requires submission of an official transcript confirming an applicant's graduate degree in audiology as part of the application process. Transcripts must be submitted directly from the institution to ABA . The transcript must include the date that the graduate degree was posted.

 

B. Applicants must document achievement of a passing score on a national examination in audiology as required by the ABA.

 

C. Applicants must document completion of a minimum of 2000 hours of mentored professional practice within a 3-year time period after completion of both their academic coursework and 375 supervised hours of direct patient care. Applicants applying in this category must document their professional practice experience. The mentor must verify this experience and make a recommendation for the granting of Board Certification. The mentor must possess a current state license/registration to practice audiology or hold current ABA certification.

 

D. Applicants must submit appropriate documentation, fees and signed affirmations regarding the truthfulness of information, adherence to the ABA Code of Ethics, and adherence to state licensure/registration regulations for the practice of audiology (where applicable) or other regulatory agency through which you are authorized to practice audiology.

 

 

Appendix II: Outside Placement Sites

HESP Graduate Students in Audiology

 

Please note: The following list is subject to change.

I. Hospitals

Baltimore VA Hospital, Baltimore

Children's Hospital, Washington , DC

Department of Otolaryngology - Georgetown University Medical Center , Washington , D.C.

Fort Belvoir Army Medical Center , Alexandria , VA

Johns Hopkins Medical Institutel, Baltimore

Kennedy/Krieger Institute, Baltimore

National Institutes of Health, Bethesda

National Naval Medical Center , Bethesda

St. Agnes Hospital , Baltimore

University of Maryland Hospital, Baltimore

VA Hospital, Washington D.C.

Walter Reed Army Medical Center , Washington D.C.

Washington Hospital Center, Washington D.C.

II. Community-based Public and Private Clinics

Anne Arundel County Health Department, Annapolis , MD

Baltimore Hearing and Speech Agency, Baltimore , MD

ENTAA Care, various sites in Maryland

Greater Baltimore Medical Center , Baltimore , MD

Hearing Assessment Center , Baltimore , MD

Howard County Diagnostic Center , Columbia , MD

Physicians Hearing Center , Falls Church , VA

Treatment and Learning Centers, Rockville

Washington Hearing and Speech Society, Washington , D.C.

III. Schools

Anne Arundel County Public Schools , MD

Charles County Public Schools , MD

Fairfax County Public Schools , VA

Kendall Demonstration Elementary School - Gallaudet University , Washington , D.C.

P.G. County Parent Infant Program, MD

River School , Washington , D.C.